Psychology

Psychology

July 12, 2017

You may have at some point gotten into an argument with someone who showed you multiple reasons why they are right and you are not. But you still somehow felt, despite all the compelling evidence that you were not entirely convinced. Your preconceived belief simply makes more sense to you. Well this phenomenon has just been found to be a normal and natural reaction of the brain to new information. A german study recently found that brains will trust their own perception of how things are more than what they see with their own eyes.

  • In an effort to find more information about the reliability of the brain, since the brain is notorious for making us see and hear things that are not there and inventing memories among other reasons we have for not trusting the brain, the researchers at the University of Osnabruck got 100 subjects and made them look at two circles. One had horizontal lines and a small patch of vertical lines and one had vertical lines without anything else. The participants were then required to find the circle containing only vertical lines while the mixed circle was placed in their blind spot.
  • The results were totally unexpected. The team expected people to miss what was in their blind spot and guess it or to choose the correct circle, however what happened was that over 60 percent of the participants quickly chose the image in their blind spot which the brain had to complete by itself.
  • The leader of the study thinks that the brain is more inclined to trust its own information than outside world data. Meaning that when the brain compares its own internal information to what the senses perceive, it will report in error when finding differences which in turn will make us disbelieve factual information.

The main conclusion of the research states that when someone believes in something strongly enough, they will most likely dismiss any contradictory evidence, no matter how convincing it may seem to its provider.

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