Exercises for your mind

0
69

Whether you’re angry, nervous, taking a yoga class or simply stressed out, you’ll always hear the advice that tells you to take a deep breath and then slowly exhale. The fact that this trick has moved around so much and survived throughout generations is simply due to the fact that it works. No one knew why but they knew it worked. Well now science may just have found the explanation of why this simple exercise can have so many benefits on our immediate well being.

  • Back in the nineties, multiple research has found that the brain contains more than 3000 neurons in a specific region that somehow linked breathing to the current state of mind. This breathing pacemaker was known to be there but the scientific community had yet to understand the mechanism behind it.
  • A new study however, found the direct link between this area and the subject’s ongoing feelings. In order to do so, the research team deactivated a number of neurons in the breathing pacemaker in mice brains and analyzed the resulting reactions of the animals.
  • The results showed that the absence of these neurons’ activity greatly reduced the mice’s alertness and made them more chilled and relaxed or as the lead researcher put it “Mellow Fellows”. On top of that the breathing patterns of the mice also changed as they became slower and more stable.
  • Moreover, the study found that the breathing pacemaker works by tracking the person’s breathing pattern and then transfers the collected information to the brain which in turn affects your current mood. When the responsible neurons are not there the information never gets to the brain which assumes that everything is fine and that there is no cause for alert.

The group of neurons that were worked on in this study made a total of 175 and were called the pranayama neurons after what indians and yoga practitioners call the act of regulating your breath.

SHARE
Previous articleBooks reading
Next articleReligions